Public consultation: King Edward VI Academy Trust propose admissions changes to improve accessibility for disadvantaged students

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The King Edward VI Academy Trust Birmingham has proposed changes to its Admissions policies for its six selective schools with an aim to improve accessibility for disadvantaged students; to ensure that there is priority for local children; and to provide a more consistent approach across our growing family of selective schools.

If adopted, these changes will apply for admission from September 2020 to the following schools:

  • King Edward VI Aston School
  • King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys
  • King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls
  • King Edward VI Five Ways School
  • King Edward VI Handsworth Grammar School for Boys
  • King Edward VI Handsworth School for Girls

The proposals are designed to enhance our historic mission of providing high-quality education, in a local school, for the children of Birmingham, regardless of background.

We aim to increase the percentage of places set aside for children eligible for the Pupil Premium from 20% to 25%.

In addition, by creating new priority catchment areas, we will ensure that all children eligible for the Pupil Premium who achieve a standard qualifying score (expected to be 205) and who live in the catchment area will be able attend their local selective school if they want.

A map of the proposed catchment areas for each school is available to view on our website as well as a presentation to explain what this might mean for your child, should they be interested in applying. Parents can check which ward they live in by visiting www.birmingham.gov.uk/wardlookup. We believe that a positive consequence of these changes will be a reduction in overall travel times to school.

The proposals are open to public consultation via Birmingham City Council. The consultation will run from 19 November 2018 – 7 January 2019.

Details are available from: HERE.

Please do make sure you respond to the consultation if you believe these proposals will positively impact your child, it would be great to hear your views.

 

1 COMMENT

  1. This is by far one of the most regressive and discriminatory proposals I have heard. It seeks to help ‘local’ pupils, but in following its straight line distance measurement, it prejudices a Walsall student who lives 4.5 miles away or approx. 17 mins away, with a test score of 250, in favour of Sutton Four Oaks pupil who lives 6.2 miles away or approx. 28 mins travel time and with a score of 220. The proposal fails to deliver on its goal of local pupils in that regard and brighter pupils. Should the school wish to select local children, which I have shown fails in any event in my example, surely it should rename itself a state school. It also discriminated against younger siblings from entering such schools by reason of them living in Walsall or Wolverhampton and yet having an older brother or sister already in the same school. All this to favour the child who lives further away, scored less, has no sibling and thus vested connection to the school and its continued success, but just happens to fall within an arbitrary catchment. Utter nonsense and very poorly thought out.

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